Featured Blog: “5 All Too Common Misconceptions About Hearing Aids” by Dr. Bert Brown

  • July 06, 2017
Featured Blog: “5 All Too Common Misconceptions About Hearing Aids” by Dr. Bert Brown

This week we are featuring otolaryngologist Dr. Bert Brown on our blog as he explores 5 misconceptions people have about hearing aids. Dr. Brown has been a practicing ENT physician for over 25 years – devoting his career to helping people with hearing challenges. His expert understanding of the hearing process led to his development of the SER™ Fitting Room, which simulates the real world and allows the patient to experience their improved hearing with their hearing aids as a whole body experience – customizing them to their individual needs.

Dr. Brown completed his Bachelor of Arts degree at Northwestern University where he received the Phi Eta Sigma and Phi Beta Kappa awards. He earned his Medical Degree from the University of Cincinnati where he was awarded the Christian R Holmes award in ENT. He completed his residency at the University of Pittsburgh Eye & Ear Hospital. Dr. Brown’s interests outside of medicine include reading, movies, and ironman triathlon. He is committed to helping his patients take full advantage of the world around them by helping them achieve the best possible hearing health.

Dr. Brown can be found in one of his two locations, in Macedonia OH or Mayfield Heights, OH.

So, what do you think is the biggest misconception about hearing aids? Our friend, Dr. Brown, sheds light on some of the misunderstandings people associate with hearing aids in his blog below:

Hearing aids make life better – is that a true statement? Like most medical devices, there are larger than life myths surrounding hearing aids. Which ones are right and which ones are wrong, though? It’s difficult to know because there is such a wide range of hearing aids on the market and hearing loss is a complicated topic. What do you think? Do hearings aids make life better? They do for most people, however; they don’t work for every kind of hearing loss. Consider five more myths about hearing aids that are plain wrong.

1. Hearing Aids Make You Feel Old

Some forms of hearing aids are perhaps a little dated looking, but the technology has come very far in the last few decades. Modern hearing aids come in brilliant colors that should make you feel anything but old. They are also available in stealth designs, so no one even has to know you are wearing one.

2. You have to be Almost Deaf to Need a Hearing Aid

Hearing aids are a practical choice for most levels of loss, not just those almost profoundly deaf. Studies show the even mild hearing loss has a considerable impact on thinking and brain health. Hearing aids provide filtering and amplification, too, so, if even the hearing loss isn’t severe, having them helps make things better.

3. Get Just One Hearing Aid and Save Money

This is a common misconception. The problem is that you don’t just hear in one ear, so even if your loss is more pronounced on one side, get two hearing aids to localize the sound. It’s just confusing if the hearing on one side sounds different.

4. Hearing Aids Only Turn Up the Volume

That is the primary function of a hearing aid, but not the only one. Today’s modern hearing aids do many amazing things. They measure the amount of amplification you need based on the volume and quality of the sound, for example. A soft voice is just as clear as the TV show you are watching.

Hearing aids are able to filter out background noises, too. Environmental sounds are a problem for those with a hearing impairment. Something as basic as a fan may block out all other sounds. Hearing aids can filter out that fan noise, so you hear people talking to you. Many hearing devices come with directional microphones, as well, so those days of trying to figure out where a sound is coming from are over.

5. Don’t Plan to Use Your Phone with a Hearing Aid

Nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, many hearing assistance devices are Bluetooth ready, meaning they connect to your phone, tablet or computer directly. They also have microphones built into them, so you can talk on the phone hands-free.

The right provider will consider many things before making a hearing aid recommendation to you. They look at your hearing test, for example, to determine your level of hearing loss. They consider what you do for a living and what features like Bluetooth might work well for you. Your job is to ask questions so you can make an informed decision when buying hearing aids and not be fooled by the myths.

Want to read more from Dr. Brown? Visit his blog: https://www.physicianhearingcenters.com/blog/